How to Use Simple Lists to Set Better Goals & Make Smarter Financial Choices

What’s your success rate with your financial goals?

How often are you accomplishing them — and how often do you let yourself down?

If you’re like most folks, you don’t have the best track record.1

A lack of willpower or forces out of your control, like getting sick, could be to blame.1

But we can also fall short of our goals when we don’t set the right objectives for ourselves — and when we don’t have a great plan for achieving them.1

That can be frustrating and make it feel like we aren’t making any progress.

And we can easily break free of that just by looking at a basic list of goals.2

No matter what you want in life, it’s not easy to translate that into financial goals with a clear path to success.2

And any of us can easily get tripped up by our emotions, biases, and misunderstandings.2

If we look at a simple list as we’re setting goals, though, we can get some perspective and see things more clearly.2

These and other benefits of basic lists in financial planning are the focus of this month’s Visual Insights Newsletter.

Click here to see it!

Setting goals doesn’t have to be a time-consuming process or a headache.

With just a couple of minutes and the right list, you could be well on your way to smarter goals and better chances of accomplishing them.2

How could lists transform your goals for the better?

Go ahead and click here to see how basic lists can improve your goal setting and financial planning.

After you read through this guide, please feel free to email me with any questions or insights that you have.

 

Sources

1. https://hbr.org/2021/01/why-we-set-unattainable-goals

2. https://www.financialplanningassociation.org/sites/default/files/2020-07/Sin_Murphy_Lamas_July2019.pdf

More Articles and Guides

Inside the Investor Mind: Bias, Belief, and a Better Way to Make Financial Decisions

Inside the Investor Mind: Bias, Belief, and a Better Way to Make Financial Decisions

What do you think it would take to make better—or even perfect—financial decisions? More information or more time? Even with that, you can also use less to do more with your money. And that means less bias when it’s time to make key financial decisions. Our feelings, muddled memories, and even faulty reasoning can all nurture our biases. So can our fears and “intuition.” Still, with a little understanding of those biases, we can start to break free of them.1 That’s the focus of this month’s Visual Insights Newsletter. Click here to see it! No...

Join Our Newsletter